(HARTFORD, CT) – Governor Ned Lamont today announced that he is approving the release of $6.8 million in state grants to fund seven projects in six municipalities across Connecticut under a competitive grant program that supports transit-oriented development and is targeted at boosting economic activity and creating jobs.

The grants are part of the state’s Transit-Oriented Development Grant Program, which is administered by the Office of Policy and Management (OPM). The program provides grants for shovel-ready capital projects located within one-half mile of existing public transportation facilities and promotes the development of infrastructure with the goal of creating walkable, mixed-use spaces that support vibrant, sustainable, and equitable communities.

“Investments in transportation infrastructure are investments in the future of our communities, our residents, and our businesses,” Governor Lamont said. “Transit-oriented development is more than asphalt and train tracks, it is a comprehensive approach that drives businesses and residents to call our state home. These seven grants for communities across Connecticut will spur further growth, creating the type of state that we all want for our future.”

Earlier this year, OPM released a request for applications for the grant program, and then reviewed, rated, and ranked each of the proposals with the input of other state agencies. Awardees will soon receive official award notification and instructions from OPM. Funding to support these grants was approved at the July 20, 2022, meeting of the State Bond Commission.

The following projects have been approved to receive grants under this round of funding:

  • Ansonia – Stabilization or Demolition of Railroad Pedestrian Bridges: $540,000 to implement restoration or demolition of two existing pedestrian bridges at 35 North Main Street and 75 Liberty Street.
  • Madison – Madison Center Project Streetscape Improvements: $761,134 for removal and relocation of overhead utility facilities, and the construction of streetscape and other roadway and pedestrian improvements in the town’s center business district on the Boston Post Road.
  • Madison – Pedestrian Improvements to Woodland Road, Route 79, and Bradley Road: $206,488 for construction of approximately 4,250 linear feet of sidewalk and associated crosswalks along Woodland Road, Route 79, and Bradley Road, connecting to previously transit-oriented development-funded sidewalks on Bradley Road and Tuxis Walkway.
  • New Britain – Myrtle Street Improvements: $2,000,000 to improve pedestrian infrastructure, erect bus shelters, and implement Complete Streets enhancements to provide better connectivity to alternative methods of transportation. This first phase will span 2,600 feet along Myrtle Street, between Washington Street and Curtis Street.
  • Norwalk – Pinnacle Transit-Orientated Development Infrastructure Project: $2,000,000 to repair sidewalks, manage stormwater, install crosswalks, underground utilities, and repave and stripe West Avenue, Merwin Street, Berkeley Street, Orchard Street, Butler Street, Quincy Street.
  • Seymour – Land Acquisition and Pre-Development Activity: $686,770 to acquire a vacant parcel across the street from the Seymour Metro North Waterbury Branch Line railroad station. Once acquired, the town will prepare the site for development and issue a request for proposals for qualified developers to enter into a joint-development agreement for a mixed-use transit-oriented development project.
  • Stamford – Pacific Street Village Pedestrian Safety and Access Project: $563,212 to create a holistic complete street by adding a new raised crosswalk and intersection, as well as several bump outs to slow traffic, increase pedestrian safety, and expand sidewalk space; new street trees and bioswales for stormwater management; and pedestrian-level lighting to improve safety at night.

This press release was made possible by:

Stephen Krauchick

By Stephen Krauchick

DoingItLocal is run by Steve Krauchick. Steve has always had interest with breaking news even as an early teen, opting to listen to the Watergate hearings instead of top 40 on the radio. His interest in news spread to become the communities breaking news leader in Connecticut’s Fairfield County. He strongly believes that the public has right to know what is happening in their backyard and that government needs to be transparent. Steve also likes promoting local businesses.

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